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NEA Student Loan Program Offers New Parent and Graduate Student Loan Options

NEA Member Benefits is pleased to make available an expanded array of NEA Student Loan Program options that provides NEA members and their families more choices to better meet their education financing needs.

In addition to the NEA® Smart Option (Undergraduate) Student Loan® by Sallie Mae®, a new NEA Parent Loan is now being offered with features as follows:

 

NEA Parent Loan:

  • For those who wish to give the gift of education—the borrower does not have to be the student’s parent
  • The borrower (e.g., parent, grandparent, aunt/uncle, spouse or other adult) is the primary borrower—the student is not a party to the loan
  • Eligible to receive the 0.25% NEA exclusive rate discount after 12 consecutive on-time payments
  • Choice of fixed or variable loan rates
  • Choose interest-only or principal and interest repayment while the student is attending school

 

The current NEA Graduate Student Loan has been enhanced with new options:

  • Repayment terms and deferral periods that are customizable based on the student’s area and length of study (includes options for MBA, Medical School, Dental School, Health Professions, Law School and more)
  • Extended terms and/or grace periods may be available for students whose programs require a much longer time commitment and often higher loan amounts

 

NEA Graduate Student Loan borrowers are still eligible to receive the 0.25% NEA exclusive rate discount after 12 consecutive on-time payments and have a choice of fixed or variable loan rates.

Members may access information on the new NEA Parent Loan program and additional Graduate Student Loan options online at www.neamb.com/sl.

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FIVE GAMES TO LEARN STUDENTS’ NAMES

Looking for a fun way to learn students’ names? Check out how these veteran educators do it.

 

Mary Klein:

As a math teacher with five or six classes each year, I play a version of the name game where I introduce myself, the first student introduces himself and then me, the second student introduces himself, the first student, and then me in that order. We continue until everyone has a turn. Then I say everyone’s name in that exact order. I usually don’t miss any name.

At the start I explain that this is a listening skill, and if each student listens carefully and practices silently as we take turns, everyone will know the names of everyone in the room. Several students will usually volunteer to show that they also know every name. I point out that they are practicing a technique that helps learn math—silently answering questions being asked of anyone in the room. Silently comparing their answer to another person’s answer.

I started this game half way through the year when I realized one ninth-grade boy did not know the names of the other students. When some one joins the class later in the year we will play again with the new student going last.

 

Pamela Belcher:

I play the name game with my six classes. I start off with my name and how I’m taking the class on a trip to Aruba. “Ms. Belcher is taking a bag of books.” The first student introduces him/herself, chooses an item to take that begins with the initial of his or her first name, and then reintroduces me. This pattern continues on until the last student has repeated all names and travel items. Works each year.

 

Randy Loukissas:

I use a small rubber football that I toss to students. Here’s how it works. I point to a child and say what I think is his or her name. If I get it wrong, the child tells me his or her name, catches the ball, and tosses it back to me. We go around the room this way until every child has a chance to catch the ball. The kids are impressed that their old lady teacher can catch and throw. It takes just a few minutes, for a few days, for me to learn the names of 150 sixth graders, and I often hear “English is fun,” as the kids leave at the end of the period.

 

Debra Zanders:

To help the students learn each other’s names, I play a version of hide and seek. One student hides out of sight in the room and the others must guess who is missing. Students learn each other’s names very quickly.

 

Rich H:

I teach six sections of physics, 25+ kids each. I start off with an “introduce your partner” whiteboard activity. I then make students’ first assignment an activity where I must know their names in two weeks. I follow that up by meeting them at the door and trying to get their names as they walk in. This not only speeds attendance (taken before the bell rings), it also gives me more practice learning their names. After two weeks, I’ve got them.

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NEA Works4Me – Ideas and Tips for Student Success

The free NEA Works4Me e-newsletter has been a staple of teachers’ professional lives for years, providing ideas and tips for student success across all subjects and grade levels. Every other week, you’ll receive a sampling of the best tips, along with best ideas on classroom management, teaching techniques, curriculum content, peer & student relationships and more. These tips are all archived and are searchable on the NEA Works4Me section of nea.org. The web site contains more than 2,000 tips searchable by topic.

Where do our tips originate? From you and other NEA members, practitioners in the field who choose to share best practices with other educators.

For more information on NEA Works4Me, go to www.nea.org/tools/Works4Me.html.

NEA Works4Me – Ideas and Tips for Student Success

The free NEA Works4Me e-newsletter has been a staple of teachers’ professional lives for years, providing ideas and tips for student success across all subjects and grade levels. Every other week, you’ll receive a sampling of the best tips, along with best ideas on classroom management, teaching techniques, curriculum content, peer & student relationships and more. These tips are all archived and are searchable on the NEA Works4Me section of nea.org. The web site contains more than 2,000 tips searchable by topic.

Where do our tips originate? From you and from NEA edCommunities members – expert practitioners in the field who choose to share best practices with other educators.

NEA edCommunities is a place where teachers, school support professionals, and community members share ideas and resources to improve student success. It is free and open to all!

For more information on NEA Works4Me or NEA edCommunities, go to www.nea.org/tools/Works4Me.html.

 

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Idaho Education Association
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